Nikki Grimes: Encountering Glory (and Silence) in the Margins

New York Times bestselling author Nikki Grimes is the recipient of the 2020 ALAN Award for outstanding contributions to young adult literature, the 2017 Children’s Literature Legacy Award, the 2016 Virginia Hamilton Literary Award, and the 2006 NCTE Award for Excellence in Poetry for Children. Her distinguished works include the much-honored books Garvey’s Choice, ALA Notable book Southwest Sunrise, Coretta Scott King Award winner Bronx Masquerade (and five Coretta Scott King Author Honor books), Printz and Siebert Honor winner Ordinary HazardsBoston Globe-Horn Book Honor One Last Word: Wisdom from the Harlem Renaissance, its companion Legacy:Women Poets of the Harlem Renaissance, and NYT Bestseller Kamala Harris:Rooted in Justice. Other titles by Ms. Grimes include Come Sunday, At Jerusalem’s Gate: Poems of Easter, and Voices of Christmas. She is the creator of the popular Meet Danitra Brown, Make Way for Dyamonde Daniel, Bedtime for Sweet Creatures, and Off to See the Sea.

Her latest book, Glory in the Margins: Sunday Poems, was recently published by Paraclete Press. Ms. Grimes lives in Corona, California.

Photo credit: Aaron Lemen

Silence is everything. — Nikki Grimes

Some of the resources and authors we mention in this episode:

Episode 137: Encountering Glory and Silence in the Margins: A Conversation with Nikki Grimes
Hosted by: Carl McColman
With: Cassidy Hall, Kevin Johnson
Guest: Nikki Grimes
Date Recorded: August 23, 2021

Amy Frykholm: Encountering the Wilderness of Silence

Dr. Amy Frykholm is an American writer whose five books of non-fiction have covered the territory of American religion from apocalypticists to saints. She is an award-winning writer and senior editor for the magazine The Christian Century, appears frequently on television and radio programs as an expert in American religion, and has lectured widely on subjects like the Rapture, purity culture, and lost female figures in Christianity. She has a PhD in Literature from Duke University.

Her books include her newest release, Wild Woman: A Footnote, the Desert, and My Quest for an Elusive Saint (Broadleaf Books, 2021), as well as, Julian of Norwich: A Contemplative Biography, See Me Naked: Stories of Sexual Exile in American Christianity, Rapture Culture: Left Behind in Evangelical America, and Christian Understandings of the Future: The Historical Trajectory. We recorded our conversation with Amy Frykholm on August 5, 2021.

There’s a real sense that it accumulates… that silence is a substance. — Amy Frykholm

Episode 136: Encountering the Wilderness of Silence: A Conversation with Dr. Amy Frykholm
Hosted by: Kevin Johnson
With: Cassidy Hall, Carl McColman
Guest: Amy Frykholm
Date Recorded: August 5, 2021

Featured image: Sinai Desert © Vyacheslav Argenberg, www.vascoplanet.com

Kevin Quashie: The Aesthetics and Poesis of Silence

DR. KEVIN QUASHIE is a professor of English at Brown University. He is the author of The Sovereignty of Quiet: Beyond Resistance in Black Culture and Black Women, Identity, and Cultural Theory: (Un)Becoming the Subject.

Silence often denotes something that is suppressed or repressed, and is an interiority that is about withholding, absence, and stillness. Quiet, on the other hand, is presence (one can, for example, describe prose or a sound as quiet) and can encompass fantastic motion. It is true that silence can be expressive, but its expression is often based on refusal or protest, not the abundance and wildness of the interior described above. Indeed, the expressiveness of silence is often aware of an audience, a watcher or listener whose presence is the reason for the withholding––it is an expressiveness which is intent and even defiant. This is a key difference between the two terms because in its inwardness, the aesthetic of quiet is watcherless. — Kevin Quashie

He is one of the co-editors of New Bones: Contemporary Black Writers in America. His essays have appeared in journals such as Meridians, African-American Review, the Massachusetts Review, Anthurium, and The Black Scholar. His most recent book is Black Aliveness, or a Poetics of Being. At Brown, Dr. Quashie teaches black cultural and literary studies, in addition to writing on teaching on black feminist/women’s studies, black queer studies and aesthetics.

An essential aspect to the idiom of prayer is waiting: the praying subject waits with agency, where waiting is not the result of having been acted upon (as in being made to wait), but is itself action. In waiting, there is no clear language or determined outcome; there is simply the practice of contemplation and discernment. This is a challenge to the way we commonly think of waiting, which is passive; it is also a disruption of the calculus of cause and effect which shapes so much of how we understand the social world.— Kevin Quashie

Our interview with Dr. Quashie proved to be that kind of rare, graced conversation where an insightful, learned discussion opened up beautifully into a resonant contemplative space.

This idea that prayer can articulate beyond its own self-indulgence is important to thinking about the bowed heads of Tommie Smith and John Carlos; that is, to read their protest as quiet expressiveness does not disavow their capacity to inspire. In fact, nothing speaks more to their humanity— and against the violence of racism—than the glimpse of their inner lives. The challenge, though, is to understand how their quiet works as a public gesture, without disregarding its interiority.— Kevin Quashie

Some of the resources and authors we mention in this episode:

Episode 135: The Aesthetics and Poesis of Silence: A Conversation with Dr. Kevin Quashie
Hosted by: Kevin Johnson
With: Cassidy Hall, Carl McColman
Guest: Kevin Quashie
Date Recorded: March 3, 2021

Featured Image: Unsplash.

 

Maisie Sparks: Enjoying God in the Silence

MAISIE SPARKS is an author, speaker, spiritual director, and retreat facilitator.

Her books include Christmas Quiet, 151 Things God Can’t Do, 101 Things the Devil Can’t Do, and Holy Shakespeare: 101 Scriptures That Appear in Shakespeare’s Plays, Poems and Sonnets.

She is an active member of the Spiritual Directors of Color Network, and her essays have appeared in anthologies like Kaleidoscope: Broadening the Palette in the Art of Spiritual Direction, Embodied Spirits: Stories of Spiritual Directors of Color, and Ain’t Gonna Let Nobody Turn Me Around — Stories of Contemplation and Justice.

She makes her home in Champaign, Illinois.

We discovered Maisie Sparks on the recommendation of our mutual friend Dr. Lerita Coleman Brown. We found our conversation with her to be filled with light. We hope you enjoy it as much as we enjoyed the conversation.

Some of the resources and authors we mention in this episode:

Episode 134: Enjoying God in the Silence: A Conversation with Maisie Sparks
Hosted by: Carl McColman
With: Cassidy Hall, Kevin Johnson
Guest: Maisie Sparks
Date Recorded: March 3, 2021

 

Encountering a New Silence with Dr. Beverly Lanzetta

Dr. Beverly Lanzetta is a theologian, contemplative scholar, interfaith chaplain, and teacher of new traditions of contemplative wisdom.

She is the author of numerous books on emerging universal spirituality and new monasticism, including Radical Wisdom: A Feminist Mystical TheologyEmerging Heart: Global Spirituality and the Sacred,  Nine Jewels of Night: One Soul’s Journey into God, The Monk Within: Embracing a Sacred Way of LifeFoundations in Spiritual Direction: Sharing the Sacred Across Traditions, and most recently, A New Silence: Spiritual Practices and Formation for the Monk Within. Her work is dedicated to a vision of theological openness and spiritual nonviolence and has won praise for its wisdom, eloquence, and mystical insight. Her voice is a significant contribution to what theologian Ursula King has called “a feminine mystical way for the 21st century.”

My deepest experience of silence is interior. Silence is a state of being, a state of interior contemplation. — Dr. Beverly Lanzetta

Dr. Lanzetta is also a vowed monk of peace living in the world, who has formed a community of new monks—single, married, partnered, celibate, etc.—dedicated to the universal mystical heart and to the spirituality of nonviolence. She mentors  people who seek a deeper contemplative commitment and who wish to take personal monastic vows. She has taught theology at Villanova University, Prescott College, and Grinnell College.

Connect with Dr. Beverly Lanzetta online by visiting www.beverlylanzetta.net.

Silence is a very dynamic place; it’s not static, it’s a place of great creativity, of presence. That’s where I feel very happy, when I’m in that energy. — Dr. Beverly Lanzetta

Some of the resources and authors we mention in this episode:

Episode 133: Encountering “A New Silence” with Dr. Beverly Lanzetta
Hosted by: Carl McColman
With: Cassidy Hall, Kevin Johnson
Guest: Dr. Beverly Lanzetta
Date Recorded: March 11, 2021

 

Featured photo by Lilibeth Brogna on Unsplash.

Sophfronia Scott: Silence, the Seeker, and the Monk

What if we truly belong to each other? What if we are all walking around shining like the sun Mystic, monk, and activist Thomas Merton asked those questions over half a century ago. Writer Sophfronia Scott is asking them today.

Sophfronia Scott grew up in Lorain, Ohio, a hometown she shares with author Toni Morrison. She holds a BA in English from Harvard and an MFA in writing from Vermont College of Fine Arts. She began her career as an award-winning magazine journalist for Time and People.

When her first novel, All I Need to Get By, was published in 2004 Sophfronia was nominated for best new author at the African American Literary Awards. Her other books include the novel Unforgiveable Love, an essay collection titled Love’s Long Line, and a memoir, This Child of Faith: Raising a Spiritual Child in a Secular World, co-written with her son.

Her most recent book, The Seeker and the Monk: Everyday Conversations with Thomas Merton was published by Broadleaf books in March of 2021.

In The Seeker and the Monk, Scott mines the extensive private journals of one of the most influential contemplative thinkers of the past for guidance on how to live in these fraught times. As a Black woman who is not Catholic, Scott both learns from and pushes back against Merton, holding spirited, and intimate conversations on race, ambition, faith, activism, nature, prayer, friendship, and love.

She asks: What is the connection between contemplation and action? Is there ever such a thing as a wrong answer to a spiritual question? How do we care about the brutality in the world while not becoming overwhelmed by it? By engaging in this lively discourse, readers will gain a steady sense of how to dwell more deeply within–and even to love–this despairing and radiant world.

Some of the resources and authors we mention in this episode:

 

Episode 132: Silence, the Seeker, and the Monk: A Conversation with Sophfronia Scott
Hosted by: Cassidy Hall
With: Carl McColman, Kevin Johnson
Guest: Sophfronia Scott
Date Recorded: March 15, 2021

Barbara Brown Taylor: Silence, Vulnerability, and Love (Part Two)


This week’s episode features the conclusion of our conversation with bestselling author and Episcopal priest Barbara Brown Taylor. Click here to listen to part one.

Renowned for her preaching as well as her writing, Barbara Brown Taylor is the author of a widely acclaimed memoir, Leaving Church; subsequent books like An Altar in the World, Learning to Walk in the Dark, and Holy Envy have all earned places on the New York Times Bestseller list. In 1997 she delivered a series of lectures on the art of preaching at Yale Divinity School, later published under the title When God is Silent. Her most recent book, Always a Guest, was published in October 2020 by Westminster John Knox Press.

I’ve found that the minute I turn the radio off, my whole body relaxes. — Barbara Brown Taylor

Barbara Brown Taylor has served on the faculties of Piedmont College, Emory University, Mercer University, Columbia Seminary, Oblate School of Theology, and the Certificate in Theological Studies program at Arrendale State Prison for Women in Alto, Georgia. She has won numerous awards, including twice being named the Georgia Author of the Year in the category of inspirational writing. She lives on a farm in north Georgia with her husband.

Some of the resources and authors we mention in this episode:

Episode 131: Silence, Vulnerability and Love: A Conversation with Barbara Brown Taylor (Part Two)
Hosted by: Carl McColman
With: Cassidy Hall, Kevin Johnson
Date Recorded: March 1, 2021

Barbara Brown Taylor: Silence, Vulnerability, and Love (Part One)


A while back, our co-host Carl McColman was impressed by a preacher he heard in Atlanta. In his words:

Back in the spring of 1988, I was living in Atlanta and on occasion would worship at All Saints’ Episcopal Church near the campus of Georgia Tech. On more than one occasion, I was impressed by the preaching of one of the associate priests on staff, the Reverend Barbara Brown Taylor. I never joined that church, and I don’t know that I ever even spoke to Taylor, but I remembered her — so that when, almost a decade later, Baylor University published a list of the 12 most effective preachers in the United States, I was not surprised to see Barbara Brown Taylor on the list.

Barbara Brown Taylor went from “renowned preacher” to “best-selling author” when her memoir about leaving parish ministry to become a college professor, Leaving Church, was met with widespread acclaim. Subsequent books like An Altar in the World, Learning to Walk in the Dark, and Holy Envy have all earned places on the New York Times Bestseller list. In 1997 she delivered a series of lectures on the art of preaching at Yale Divinity School, later published under the title When God is Silent. Her most recent book, Always a Guest, was published in October 2020 by Westminster John Knox Press.

This is part one of a two part episode. To hear part two, click here.

Silence is a love language. — Barbara Brown Taylor

Barbara Brown Taylor has served on the faculties of Piedmont College, Emory University, Mercer University, Columbia Seminary, Oblate School of Theology, and the Certificate in Theological Studies program at Arrendale State Prison for Women in Alto, Georgia. She has won numerous awards, including twice being named the Georgia Author of the Year in the category of inspirational writing. She lives on a farm in north Georgia with her husband.

Some of the resources and authors we mention in this episode:

Episode 130: Silence, Vulnerability and Love: A Conversation with Barbara Brown Taylor (Part One)
Hosted by: Carl McColman
With: Cassidy Hall, Kevin Johnson
Date Recorded: March 1, 2021

Encountering Silence and Contemplating Now

This week of Encountering Silence, we’re listening in on co-host Cassidy Hall’s new podcast, Contemplating Now: A Podcast about the Intersection of Contemplation and Social Justice.
Don’t worry—Encountering Silence is still here and we will continue to bring you episodes exploring the beauty and importance of silence from many angles. Stick around for some very exciting upcoming interviews and conversations!
In this very first Episode of Contemplating Now, Cassidy Hall interviews previous guest of Encountering SilenceTherese Taylor-Stinson in a conversation titled, “Everybody Can Be A Mystic.”

I think everybody can be a mystic… Mystic means you’re living with a certain amount of uncertainty. –Therese Taylor-Stinson

Therese is the co-editor of “Embodied Spirits: Stories of Spiritual Directors of Color,” and the editor of “Ain’t Gonna Let Nobody Turn Me Around — Stories of Contemplation and Justice.” She is an ordained deacon and elder in the Presbyterian Church (PCUSA), a lay pastoral caregiver, and a graduate of and an associate faculty member of the Shalem Institute for Spiritual Formation, where she previously served as a member of the board.

She is the founder of the Spiritual Directors of Color Network, an international, ecumenical/interfaith association of persons of color with a ministry of spiritual accompaniment. A native of Washington DC, she now lives in Maryland. Her ministry, like her books, explores the intersection of contemplative spirituality and the ongoing struggle for social justice and the dismantling of racism.

We can all be getting in some trouble if we aren’t going along with the status quo. –Therese Taylor-Stinson

Join us in subscribing to Contemplating Now at Apple PodcastsSpotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts. Find out more about the podcast at the Christian Century

Contemplating Now music: Trapezoid Instrumental, by EmmoLei Sankofa Introduction music: First Steps, by Cast Of Characters

Silence in Sound: A Collection of Ambient Field Recordings

This episode of Encountering Silence is a little different from our regular format. Carl McColman gives co-hosts Cassidy Hall and Kevin Johnson the week off, and shares an assortment of field recordings — mostly, but not entirely, recordings of nature from a variety of locations, times of day, and times of year. All of these recordings were captured by either Carl or his wife Fran, using their iphones. These are recordings of birds in South Carolina, a waterfall in North Carolina, the surf on the Pacific coast of California, the wind whistling in Scotland, and many more. While mostly recordings of the natural world, there are human-made sounds as well, from the traffic of Atlanta, to an almost mystical art installation in London’s Kew Gardens.

Fran and Carl McColman, McClures Beach, California, December 2018

So why, on a podcast devoted to speaking about silence, are we opting this episode for a collection of sound recordings? Even though they were recorded by amateurs, hopefully these ambient recordings are interesting and maybe even beautiful. But this is meant to be more than just an aesthetic experience.

Poster promoting the Hive at Kew Gardens

Carl notes, “I believe that silence is more than just the absence of sound — that silence is also a state of mind, or perhaps a state of the heart. Silence is that place where we can be truly receptive to what life has to offer us, show us, and teach us. We need silence to listen to each other, and to listen to the still small voice of God within. My hope is that these field recordings will represent, for you, a chance to listen for the silence that exists even in the midst of nature’s sounds and songs. There’s silence in between the notes of a bird’s song, in the pause of the rhythm of the surf, and in the midst of a babbling brook. So I invite you to listen for the silence between the sound waves — and maybe even in the midst of these ambient sounds.”

McClures Beach, California, video by Fran McColman — one of the ambient field recordings collected in this episode of Encountering Silence.

Some resources related to places, etc. mentioned in this episode:

Episode 128: Encountering Silence in Sound: A Collection of Ambient Field Recordings
Hosted by: Carl McColman
Date Recorded: February 14, 2021 (field recordings at various dates)

Featured image: Santa Rosa Beach, Florida; photo by Carl McColman

Sarah Griffith Lund: Silence, Marriage and Mental Health (Part Two)

Today Sarah Griffith Lund returns to Encountering Silence. She is the senior pastor of First Congregational United Church of Christ in Indianapolis, and serves the United Church of Christ on a national level as the Minister for Disabilities and Mental Health Justice. She holds degrees from Trinity University, Princeton Theological Seminary, Rutgers University and McCormick Theological Seminary.

Sarah Griffith Lund received the Bob and Joyce Dell Award for Mental Health Education from the United Church of Christ Mental Health Network in 2015 for “her outstanding authorship and leadership in breaking the silence about mental illness in family and in church and offering healing and hope.”

Her latest book is Blessed Union: Breaking the Silence About Mental Illness and Marriage. She is also the author of Blessed Are the Crazy: Breaking the Silence about Mental Illness, Family and Church. She also maintains a blog at www.sarahgriffithlund.com.

The biggest barrier to receiving treatment, care and support is not money, it’s not access to quality health care… it’s the stigma and shame associated with mental health challenges. — Sarah Griffith Lund

This is part two of a two part interview. To hear part one, click here.

Some of the resources and authors we mention in this episode:

Episode 127: Silence, Marriage and Mental Heath: A Conversation with Sarah Griffith Lund (Part Two)
Hosted by: Carl McColman
With: Cassidy Hall and Kevin Johnson
Guest: Sarah Griffith Lund
Date Recorded: January 11, 2021

Featured photo by Adrienne Holton on Unsplash.

Sarah Griffith Lund: Silence, Marriage and Mental Health (Part One)

Today Sarah Griffith Lund returns to Encountering Silence. She is the senior pastor of First Congregational United Church of Christ in Indianapolis, and serves the United Church of Christ on a national level as the Minister for Disabilities and Mental Health Justice. She holds degrees from Trinity University, Princeton Theological Seminary, Rutgers University and McCormick Theological Seminary.

Sarah Griffith Lund received the Bob and Joyce Dell Award for Mental Health Education from the United Church of Christ Mental Health Network in 2015 for “her outstanding authorship and leadership in breaking the silence about mental illness in family and in church and offering healing and hope.”

Her latest book is Blessed Union: Breaking the Silence About Mental Illness and Marriage. She is also the author of Blessed Are the Crazy: Breaking the Silence about Mental Illness, Family and Church. She also maintains a blog at www.sarahgriffithlund.com.

The biggest barrier to receiving treatment, care and support is not money, it’s not access to quality health care… it’s the stigma and shame associated with mental health challenges. — Sarah Griffith Lund

This is part one of a two part interview. The conclusion to this interview will be released as our next episode.

Some of the resources and authors we mention in this episode:

Episode 126: Silence, Marriage and Mental Heath: A Conversation with Sarah Griffith Lund (Part One)
Hosted by: Carl McColman
With: Cassidy Hall and Kevin Johnson
Guest: Sarah Griffith Lund
Date Recorded: January 11, 2021

Featured image photo by Sandy Millar on Unsplash.

Patrick Shen: Silence and the Dawn Chorus

Patrick Shen, filmmaker, lover of silence, and good friend of this podcast, returns to share with us the news of his latest project: The Dawn Chorus.

On May 3, 2020, thirty-five filmmakers in thirteen countries banded together to capture the first light and sounds of the day from their unique perspectives in the midst of the Covid-19 lockdown. The Dawn Chorus is the result of this global collaboration.

Watch the film’s trailer above. And then we invite you to take advantage of this limited-time, special offer for listeners of Encountering Silence: watch The Dawn Chorus for free. Just visit watch.dawnchorusfilm.com and enter the password encounteringsilence. This offer is only available through January 17, 2020, so take advantage of it now!

Patrick Shen (lower left) speaks with Encountering Silence (clockwise from upper left: Carl McColman, Cassidy Hall and Kevin Johnson).

Patrick is the director of several acclaimed films, most notably  In Pursuit of Silence (Cassidy Hall was the co-producer). His other titles include  Flight from Death: The Quest for ImmortalityThe Philosopher Kings, and La Source. Patrick’s films have been screened at over a hundred and twenty film festivals across the globe and broadcast in over twenty-five territories. He was the recipient of the 2009 Emerging Cinematic Vision Award from Camden International Film Festival.

Patrick and Cassidy are the co-authors of a companion book to In Pursuit of Silence,  Notes from Silence which is available on the Kindle.

Find Patrick Shen online at www.patrickshen.com or

 

A lot of us when we step into silence, at least initially, find our narratives or identity stripped away, and it’s a lot like a little death of sorts, and it’s terrifying. — Patrick Shen

Some of the resources and authors we mention in this episode:

Episode 125: Silence and the Dawn Chorus: A Conversation with Patrick Shen
Hosted by: 
Cassidy Hall
With: 
Carl McColman and Kevin Johnson
Guest: Patrick Shen
Date Recorded: 
January 5, 2021
Featured photo by Patrick Shen

Kaya Oakes, Silence, the Body, and Women Mystics (Part Two)

The conclusion of our conversation with writer Kaya Oakes. Click here to listen to part one.

Essayist and journalist Kaya Oakes is the author of The Nones Are Alright: A New Generation of Believers, Seekers, and Those in Between, Radical Reinvention: An Unlikely Return to the Catholic ChurchSlanted and Enchanted: The Evolution of Indie Culture, and a book of poetry, Telegraph. Her next book, Medieval: How Women who Don’t Fit in are Changing the World, is forthcoming from Broadleaf Books in 2021.

Kaya’s essays and journalism have appeared in The New Republic, Slate, Foreign Policy, The Guardian, The Washington Post, Sojourners, National Catholic Reporter, Commonweal, Religion Dispatches, Tricycle, On Being, America, and many other publications. She was the co-founder of the award-winning arts and culture magazine Kitchen Sink, and is currently on the editorial board of the ground-breaking religion website Killing the Buddha.

She teaches creative nonfiction, narrative journalism, expository and research writing at the University of California, Berkeley.

You can find her online at www.oakestown.org.

Some of the resources and authors we mention in this episode:

Episode 124: Silence, the Body, and Women Mystics: A Conversation with Kaya Oakes (Part Two)
Hosted by: Carl McColman
With: Cassidy Hall, Kevin Johnson
Guest: Kaya Oakes
Date Recorded: November 30, 2020

Featured photo (University of California, Berkeley) by Eden Rushing.

Kaya Oakes, Silence, the Body, and Women Mystics (Part One)

Essayist and journalist Kaya Oakes is the author of The Nones Are Alright: A New Generation of Believers, Seekers, and Those in Between, Radical Reinvention: An Unlikely Return to the Catholic ChurchSlanted and Enchanted: The Evolution of Indie Culture, and a book of poetry, Telegraph. Her next book, Medieval: How Women who Don’t Fit in are Changing the World, is forthcoming from Broadleaf Books in 2021.

This episode is part one of a two-part conversation with writer Kaya Oakes. Click here to listen to part two.

Kaya’s essays and journalism have appeared in The New Republic, Slate, Foreign Policy, The Guardian, The Washington Post, Sojourners, National Catholic Reporter, Commonweal, Religion Dispatches, Tricycle, On Being, America, and many other publications. She was the co-founder of the award-winning arts and culture magazine Kitchen Sink, and is currently on the editorial board of the ground-breaking religion website Killing the Buddha.

She teaches creative nonfiction, narrative journalism, expository and research writing at the University of California, Berkeley.

You can find her online at www.oakestown.org.

Some of the resources and authors we mention in this episode:

Episode 123: Silence, the Body, and Women Mystics: A Conversation with Kaya Oakes (Part One)
Hosted by: Carl McColman
With: Cassidy Hall, Kevin Johnson
Guest: Kaya Oakes
Date Recorded: November 30, 2020

Featured photo (St. Julian’s Cell, Norwich England) by Carl McColman.